This is a public collection of knowledge funded and/or published by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF). Views, opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in these publications are those of the authors and their respective organizations. They do not necessarily reflect the views, policies or positions of WKKF.

If you have additional questions, please contact our Concierge Desk via email.
Clear all

115 results found

reorder grid_view

Race in the workplace: The frontline experience

July 30, 2022

The vast majority of Americans are introduced to the workforce through frontline jobs—whether waiting tables, stocking store shelves, or folding clothes. Approximately 70 percent of the current U.S. workforce is concentrated in frontline jobs, which is also the most diverse part of the workforce. Too often, however, frontline jobs are both a starting point and an end point for workers. This research, a collaboration between McKinsey & Company, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, PolicyLink and Walmart, found this challenge is especially true for frontline workers of color, who face an array of impediments to moving up the ladder. This report shines a light on the experiences of frontline workers of color, the pathways upwards from the front line, and the skills workers need to advance. It also offers steps companies could take to improve job quality and better support frontline workers of color to develop and progress in their careers.

Employment Equity

The Economic Role of Paid Child Care in the U.S.

February 10, 2022

One of the most fundamental roles played by child care is enabling parents to participate in the labor force. Most parents with young children are in the workforce. Among U.S. families with a child under age 5, 91% have a working parent. For married couple families, 98% have at least one working parent and 60% have both parents in the workforce. For families maintained by only one parent, 79% of mothers and 88% of fathers who head the household are employed. To support employment, parents choose from a broad range of child care options, either paid or unpaid. This report focuses on the role played by paid child care services. Paid care provides parents with a market-based alternative to in-home parental care and other forms of non-paid care.

Mobility Matters Employment and Advancement for Working Parents

December 6, 2021

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF) supported two innovative initiatives over a three year period that yielded some impressive results for single mothers and working families. The STEPS (Supporting Transitions to Employment for Parents) program served to help working parents enter the labor market, while the MOVE UP (Mobility and Opportunity for Valuable Employment by Upskilling Parents) program focused on providing low-income workers opportunities to move up within the labor market, thereby increasing income and job stability. Between 2015 and 2018, WKKF invested $11 million to support 13 different organizations to implement these two pilot programs. This report overviews findings from those investments.

Mobility Matters Employment and Advancement for Working Parents-Executive Summary

December 6, 2021

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF) supported two innovative initiatives over a three year period that yielded some impressive results for single mothers and working families. The STEPS (Supporting Transitions to Employment for Parents) program served to help working parents enter the labor market, while the MOVE UP (Mobility and Opportunity for Valuable Employment by Upskilling Parents) program focused on providing low-income workers opportunities to move up within the labor market, thereby increasing income and job stability. Between 2015 and 2018, WKKF invested $11 million to support 13 different organizations to implement these two pilot programs. This summary overviews findings from those investments.

W.K. Kellogg Foundation U.S.-Based Workforce and Board Composition Report by Race/Ethnicity, Gender and Job Category

August 31, 2021

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation has produced a report to show the composition of United States based workforce by race/ethnicity, gender and job category.

Diversifying the Healthcare Workforce: Implications for Birth Outcomes

August 1, 2021

A diverse maternal and child health workplace is one that has employees of different ages, genders, racial and ethnic backgrounds, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and personality bringing a multitude of lived experiences to institutions and organizations. The benefits of having a diverse workforce are far-reaching and include improvements to innovation, increased productivity, increased team communication and engagement (1-3). Overall, the U.S. population continues to become more diverse, and, in some states, there is a majority-minority population. This occurs when 50% or more of the population is composed of racial and ethnic minorities (3). While the population has continued to diversify, the healthcare workforce has not kept pace. These continued changes in the racial and ethnic make-up of the general population makes it likely that health professionals will engage with patients that have different cultural backgrounds from their own. The lack of diversity in the workforce across all health professions has revealed a national public health issue that needs attention. Initiatives and sustainable strategies for all local, state and federal levels and within public and private sectors will help better ensure that the healthcare workforce meets the needs of the diverse patient population and reflects the racial and ethnic diversity across the nation and in Michigan. 

Employment Equity; Health Equity; Maternal and Child Health

Family Centered Employment Toolkit

May 25, 2021

This toolkit is intended for Workforce Development Boards on implementing a two-generation approach and family centered employment and related resources and links.

Race in the workplace: The Black experience in the US private sector

February 21, 2021

Advancing racial equity in companies is action-oriented work. Black workers, in particular, face challenges – from the structural inequities of geography to underrepresentation in industries that might create additional opportunity to the cultures and behaviors within their workplaces. This report, which is part of a new comprehensive series by McKinsey & Company, was produced In collaboration with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, PolicyLink and Walmart, lifts Black American voices and shares their experiences in the U.S. private sector. The research is organized in three parts: first, a summary of Black Americans' participation in the U.S. private sector economy; second, their representation, advancement and experiences in companies; and third, recommendations and actions companies can take in response, along with additional actions a wider set of stakeholders can take to accelerate progress on diversity, equity and inclusion.

Employment Equity; Racial Equity and Healing

COVID-19 the Family, State and Federal Policy Lessons Learned in New England’

February 3, 2021

This report captures insights, lessons, and recommendations for family-centered policy and practice and how to support families in this new COVID-19 context, drawn from frontline participants' input across states.

A Racial Equity Framework for Workforce Development Funders

January 31, 2021

The framework was born out of a dire need to do better. Many laudable workforce programs and practitioners are making strides in their communities to improve job opportunities for People of Color. Yet it is not enough. The framework outlined in this report identifies concrete ways to interrupt the systemic racism embedded within the field's practices, policies, and programs; the institution of philanthropy; our own organizations; and the labor market in communities we serve. It asks funders in the workforce development ecosystem to consider how we are using our power, influence, grantmaking, and roles within our institutions to contribute to, or dismantle, this racism.

Employment Equity; Racial Equity and Healing

A Racial Equity Framework for Workforce Development Funders (Executive Summary)

January 31, 2021

The framework was born out of a dire need to do better. Many laudable workforce programs and practitioners are making strides in their communities to improve job opportunities for People of Color. Yet it is not enough. The framework outlined in this report identifies concrete ways to interrupt the systemic racism embedded within the field's practices, policies, and programs; the institution of philanthropy; our own organizations; and the labor market in communities we serve. It asks funders in the workforce development ecosystem to consider how we are using our power, influence, grantmaking, and roles within our institutions to contribute to, or dismantle, this racism.

Employment Equity; Racial Equity and Healing

Caring for the Future: The Power and Potential of America’s Direct Care Workforce

January 8, 2021

This report is the culmination of a year-long series of reports (released throughout 2020) providing a comprehensive, current-day analysis of the direct care workforce and its critical role in the long-term care system in the United States. By bringing these reports together, this final report provides: a detailed profile of these workers; a segmented look at the long-term care industry; a discussion on the evolving role of the direct care worker; a proposed framework for creating quality jobs in direct care; and a look forward at where this workforce and industry are heading. The report also offers concrete recommendations for policymakers, employers, advocates, and other long-term care leaders, and features stories of direct care workers from around the country, sharing their wisdom and ideas. In releasing this report, our goal is to strengthen the national dialogue on the direct care workforce, including what needs to change in policy and in practice.workforce,including what needs to change in policy and in practice.

Showing 12 of 115 results

arrow_upward