This is a public collection of knowledge funded and/or published by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF). Views, opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in these publications are those of the authors and their respective organizations. They do not necessarily reflect the views, policies or positions of WKKF.

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Quality Health Care for Louisiana Kids

September 9, 2021

Medicaid and the Louisiana Child Health Insurance Program (LaCHIP) are the most common source of health coverage for low-income women and children in Louisiana - providing vital health care coverage to nearlya million children and mothers. This number has only grown amid theeconomic hardship of the Covid-19 pandemic. The quality of care provided through these programs has long-term implications for child, family and population health. This was true before the pandemic, from which the most-recent data was drawn, and will remain so as Louisiana emerges from the pandemic.The Child Core Set (CCS), developed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS), offers an annual glimpse into the quality of care provided to Medicaid and LaCHIP families across five care categories: Primary Care Access and Preventative Care, Maternal and Perinatal Health, Care of Acute and Chronic Conditions, Behavioral Health Care and Dental and Oral Health Services. Reporting is voluntary until 2024 when it becomes mandatory for all states.

Maternal and Child Health

The Impact of a Poverty Reduction Intervention on Infant Brain Activity

August 25, 2021

Early childhood poverty is a risk factor for lower school achievement, reduced earnings, and poorer health, and has been associated with differences in brain structure and function. Whether poverty causes differences in neurodevelopment, or is merely associated with factors that cause such differences, remains unclear. Here, we report estimates of the causal impact of a poverty reduction intervention on brain activity in the first year of life. We draw data from a subsample of the Baby's First Years study, which recruited 1,000 diverse low-income mother–infant dyads. Shortly after giving birth, mothers were randomized to receive either a large or nominal monthly unconditional cash gift. Infant brain activity was assessed at approximately 1 y of age in the child's home, using resting electroencephalography (EEG; n = 435). We hypothesized that infants in the high-cash gift group would have greater EEG power in the mid- to high-frequency bands and reduced power in a low-frequency band compared with infants in the low-cash gift group. Indeed, infants in the high-cash gift group showed more power in high-frequency bands. Effect sizes were similar in magnitude to many scalable education interventions, although the significance of estimates varied with the analytic specification. In sum, using a rigorous randomized design, we provide evidence that giving monthly unconditional cash transfers to mothers experiencing poverty in the first year of their children's lives may change infant brain activity. Such changes reflect neuroplasticity and environmental adaptation and display a pattern that has been associated with the development of subsequent cognitive skills.

Power Beyond Measure 2021

April 20, 2021

Power Beyond Measure: Reshaping the Research and Evaluation Landscape for Boys and Men of Color is a new research agenda that outlines six strategies for advancing equity and opportunity for Boys and Men of Color (BMOC) in the U.S.These strategies and recommendations lift up ways to ensure BMOC voices and perspectives are reflected in research and funding; to promote power and capacity-building in their communities; and to build more equitable, anti-racist research and evaluation systems.

A Racial Equity Framework for Workforce Development Funders

January 31, 2021

The framework was born out of a dire need to do better. Many laudable workforce programs and practitioners are making strides in their communities to improve job opportunities for People of Color. Yet it is not enough. The framework outlined in this report identifies concrete ways to interrupt the systemic racism embedded within the field's practices, policies, and programs; the institution of philanthropy; our own organizations; and the labor market in communities we serve. It asks funders in the workforce development ecosystem to consider how we are using our power, influence, grantmaking, and roles within our institutions to contribute to, or dismantle, this racism.

Employment Equity; Racial Equity and Healing

A Racial Equity Framework for Workforce Development Funders (Executive Summary)

January 31, 2021

The framework was born out of a dire need to do better. Many laudable workforce programs and practitioners are making strides in their communities to improve job opportunities for People of Color. Yet it is not enough. The framework outlined in this report identifies concrete ways to interrupt the systemic racism embedded within the field's practices, policies, and programs; the institution of philanthropy; our own organizations; and the labor market in communities we serve. It asks funders in the workforce development ecosystem to consider how we are using our power, influence, grantmaking, and roles within our institutions to contribute to, or dismantle, this racism.

Employment Equity; Racial Equity and Healing

Power Beyond Measure: Reshaping the Research and Evaluation Landscape for Boys and Men of Color

January 1, 2021

Power Beyond Measure: Reshaping the Research and Evaluation Landscape for Boys and Men of Color is a new research agenda that outlines six strategies for advancing equity and opportunity for Boys and Men of Color (BMOC) in the U.S. These strategies and recommendations lift up ways to ensure their voices and perspectives are reflected in research and funding; to promote power and capacity-building in their communities; and to build more equitable, anti-racist research and evaluation systems.

Racial Equity and Healing

Native Youth are Medicine

November 24, 2020

The series of events we've recently experienced have taught us that we, as Native people, need to prepare for the many challenges facing this world. Independence and freedom are our continuing aspirations. The truth is that the solutions to today's world problems lie in our diversity. Resilience is embedded in the Native American youth experience and this provides Native Youth with a unique perspective of the world that empowers them to enact change in their communities. In this age of technology, our youth are incredibly well-educated with access to the data and resources needed to effect change. Now is the time to learn from Native youth, amplify their voices, and join Native youth as they work to improve our country and the world. 

The Great Service Divide: Occupational Segregation, Inequality, and the Promise of a Living Wage in the Seattle Restaurant Industry

July 1, 2020

With 40 percent of the Washington restaurant workforce composed of workers of color, restaurant professions could provide real pathways to living-wage professions for Black, Latinx, Asian, and Indigenous workers.3 However, the current structure of the industry denies living-wage opportunities to a large percentage of this diverse workforce. In order to determine the role of passive or implicit, and active discrimination in hiring practices in Seattle's restaurant industry, the Restaurant Opportunities Centers (ROC) United has partnered with the Seattle Office for Civil Rights to examine restaurant hiring practices and the experiences of workers of color. Utilizing census data to analyze segregation patterns within the industry, matched pair audit tests of job seekers, and interviews and focus groups with restaurant workers, we examined patterns of discrimination in the industry in order to craft proposals to support and encourage the adoption of racial equity practices by employers and the industry at large.

A Roadmap to Improve Child Well-Being in Louisiana

February 3, 2020

THE ANNIE E. CASEY FOUNDATION uses data from 16 different indicators of child well-being to create an overall ranking for all 50 states in its annual KIDS COUNT Data Book. The 16 indicators are organized into four domains: economic well-being, education, health, and family and community. The Foundation converts the data for each indicator to a standard score, and the standard scores are then added together to create a standard score for each domain. These domain-level standard scores are then added together to produce each state's unique score. These scores are then ranked, with 1 being the best and 50 being the worst. States do not tie for an overall ranking, but can tie for rankings on specific indicators. For example, Louisiana ranked 49th overall in child well-being, meaning that 48 states had better standard scores based on all 16 indicators. However, it tied with 11 other states for 6th place for the percentage of children without health insurance, while four states tied for second place. As a result, improving by just one ranking on this measure would mean moving from 6th place to 2nd place. In this instance, a relatively small change (connecting an additional 7,900 children to health insurance) would result in a big improvement on our ranking. In instances where several states share a ranking, this report describes what it would take to improve by "1+" or "5+" rankings. It is also important to note that Louisiana's rankings are dependent on the performance of other states. Our estimates of what it would take to improve a ranking are based on point-in-time data reported in the 2019 Data Book; changes in other states' outcomes (positive or negative) will affect Louisiana's future rankings. This means that even if Louisiana improves on an indicator from one year to the next, its ranking may not rise if other states improve at the same, or faster, rate.

Parents And Children Thriving Together: A Framework For Two-Generation Policy And System Reform

January 1, 2020

This brief explores the lessons learned from the 2016 Parents and Children Thriving Together: Two Generation State Policy Network (PACTT Network), a collaboration between the National Governors Association (NGA) and the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) with funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Through this initiative, five states explored how to use the two-generation approach to improve their state systems that serve children and parents. This brief summarizes the lessons learned from the two-year initiative and provides a framework to help guide state leaders trying to implement two-generation strategies.

Talent Justice Report: Investing in Equity in the Nonprofit Workforce

May 29, 2019

Produced by Fund the People and the Center for Urban and Racial Equity, this comprehensive report offers important findings on the challenges and opportunities of investing in intersectional racial equity in the U.S. nonprofit workforce.With over 12 million paid workers, nonprofits employ the third largest U.S. workforce. This means 1 in 10 people work in the nonprofit sector. Despite its size and impact, nonprofits face a chronic deficit of investment in their staff.To further complicate matters, the nonprofit workforce struggles to attract, retain, and support people from racially, ethnically, and otherwise diverse backgrounds to build a robust and durable talent pipeline. Our research gathered and analyzed data from over 1,400 survey responses, 3 focus groups, 20 interviews, and a literature review.

Impact Investing; Racial Equity and Healing

Grantmaking with a Racial Justice Lens

January 1, 2019

When the Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity (PRE), in partnership with GrantCraft, released Grantmaking with a Racial Equity Lens, a few foundations had made racial equity a central focus of their work, but many were still exploring how to incorporate equity into their grantmaking.Our guide helped surface how to advance racial equity in philanthropy, aiming to make it a core practice and goal of grantmakers. Rather than other popular approaches of the time—"colorblindness," universal approaches, diversity—PRE's guide defined a racially equitable world as one where the distribution of resources, opportunities and burdens is not determined or predictable by race. We successfully argued that an explicit racial equity lens ensures that the particular needs and assets of communities are t

Racial Equity and Healing

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