This is a public collection of knowledge funded and/or published by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF). Views, opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in these publications are those of the authors and their respective organizations. They do not necessarily reflect the views, policies or positions of WKKF.

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Living Cities Blended Catalyst Fund 2021 Annual Report

November 9, 2021

This report summarizes Living Cities Blended Catalyst Fund's ("BCF" or the "Fund") activities during its sixth year of operations, from July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2021 (FY21). During this fiscal year, the BCF Team fully committed the Fund as of March 31, 2021 reaching 26 investments totaling $33.5MM. The latter half of the BCF investments have been aligned with the iterated investment thesis we articulated in 2018, which was to focus on closing racial wealth gaps, and specifically to lend to organizations and intermediaries that are: (1) Managed and/or owned by people of color. (2) Finding alternative ways of creating income and wealth-building opportunities for people of color, primarily by providing increased access to capital. This includes entities that have created alternative underwriting methodologies to create a more inclusive credit box; that are providing more flexible capital, with different types of terms and through alternative fund structures; and that are providing advisory services, technical assistance, and other types of support to entrepreneurs of color. (3) Building the ecosystem for entrepreneurs and managers of color. We thank you for your support and are excited to begin to explore and share lessons learned as our portfolio continues to mature. Additionally, the Living Cities Catalyst Funds were named to the ImpactAssets 50 (IA50), an impact investing showcase featuring fund managers that deliver social, environmental, and financial returns, for the tenth consecutive year in February 2021. The IA50 is the first open-source, publicly published database of exceptional impact investing fund managers. Living Cities has been included in the IA50 every year since IA50's inception.

Big Cities Health Coalition Annual Report 2020

April 2, 2021

Big city health departments made a huge impact in 2020. Faced with a once-in-a-century pandemic, funding shortages, and political pressures, public health leaders worked tirelessly to protect the health of their jurisdictions. In our 2020 Annual Report, we highlight just a few of the countless ways that we worked with members to advance equity and health in our cities.

For 90 Years...for Children, 2020 W.K. Kellogg Foundation Annual Report

February 17, 2021

In the nine decades since Will Keith Kellogg established the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, our dedication to his vision for children has only deepened. In a 90th year of challenges and crises, Mr. Kellogg's bold action so that "children can face the future with confidence" is more compelling and vital than ever.

Seeing with Fresh Eyes: Our DNA in Action, 2019 W.K. Kellogg Foundation Annual Report (En Español)

February 1, 2020

More than a dozen stories illustrate how grantees are advancing racial equity and racial healing, building trust through community engagement and demonstrating courageous leadership to widen equitable opportunities for children and their families. 

Seeing with Fresh Eyes: Our DNA in Action, 2019 W.K. Kellogg Foundation Annual Report (An Kreyòl)

February 1, 2020

More than a dozen stories illustrate how grantees are advancing racial equity and racial healing, building trust through community engagement and demonstrating courageous leadership to widen equitable opportunities for children and their families.  

Community Engagement; Early Childhood Education; Employment Equity; Food Systems; Health Equity; Impact Investing; Leadership; Maternal and Child Health; Racial Equity and Healing

Seeing With Fresh Eyes: Our DNA in Action, 2019 W.K. Kellogg Foundation Annual Report

February 1, 2020

More than a dozen stories illustrate how grantees are advancing racial equity and racial healing, building trust through community engagement and demonstrating courageous leadership to widen equitable opportunities for children and their families.

2019 Social Impact Annual Report: Chocolate Milk: The Documentary

January 1, 2020

Chocolate Milk is a graybayne film/media production, directed and produced by Elizabeth Gray Bayne. The project began in 2014 as a digital storytelling project in which the personal breastfeeding stories of African American mothers were collected and hosted on a YouTube channel called Chocolate Milk: The Documentary Series. Over the course of three seasons, the series became a tool for health centers and physicians' offices across the United States. After working closely with community stakeholders to better understand the racial breastfeeding disparities affecting black mothers in the U.S., the team set about producing Chocolate Milk: The Documentary, a 90-minute film with a primary target audience of African American women ages 18 through 34 and a secondary audience of family members, health providers and the general public. An early cut of the film, which follows three African American women, a new mother, a homebirth midwife and WIC lactation expert, was previewed in 200 communities nationwide during National Breastfeeding Month and Black Breastfeeding Week in August 2019.These community screenings demonstrated the effectiveness of Chocolate Milk: The Documentary in increasing community support for black breastfeeding mothers by galvanizing organizations, the public, and policymakers. In this report, the results of an audience survey and the overall findings from the national social impact campaign for the film will be presented, demonstrating the value of narrative in raising awareness and community support for breastfeeding.

Health Equity; Maternal and Child Health

Interconnections: What Children Need to Thrive, 2018 W.K. Kellogg Foundation Annual Report

February 20, 2019

Explore seven grantee stories, letters from our leaders and a look at our Year in Review – each reaffirming WKKF priorities of thriving children, working families and equitable communities, while highlighting the many levels of dynamic interconnections, essential to lasting change.

W.K. Kellogg Foundation December 2017 Grants

January 3, 2018

The list of W.K. Kellogg Foundation grants approved in December 2017.

Real Change for Children, 2016 W.K. Kellogg Foundation Annual Report

March 6, 2017

The realities of the past year challenge all of philanthropy, including the Kellogg Foundation, to work differently. This report explores the foundation's deep commitment and work to advance racial healing and racial equity – work that has become core to our organizational DNA.

The Child Opportunity Index: Measuring and Mapping Neighborhood-Based Opportunities for U.S. Children

August 1, 2016

We begin this report with a tale of two neighborhoods that are close in distance (under 3 miles) but very far apart in terms of the opportunities they offer children. In the first neighborhood, children face a host of obstacles to  opportunity and wellbeing. Few attend Pre-K programs and there are limited quality early childhood centers in close proximity. Local schools have high levels of poverty concentration; adults have low levels of educational attainment. The social and economic climate is characterized by high rates of poverty and unemployment. Moreover, high rates of housing vacancy, an absence of healthy food retailers, and very low availability of health facilities signal constrained health and environmental opportunities. In the second neighborhood, child-focused opportunities are plentiful. The educational climate is vibrant with a vast majority of young children attending Pre-K programs, many high quality early childhood education centers nearby, and high levels of education among adults. The social and economic climate is thriving with low rates of poverty and unemployment. Children have ample parks and green spaces, all food outlets are healthy, and there are close to 200 health facilities within 2 miles.This divergent tale of two neighborhoods shows how vastly opportunities for children can differ within the samemetropolitan area (and within just a few miles). Because neighborhoods have a direct influence on child health anddevelopment, and because children in metropolitan areas face high levels of racial/ethnic segregation, it is critical tounderstand the extent of neighborhood differences at a population level, and how these differences may reinforce (oralleviate) racial/ethnic inequities in child wellbeing. The Child Opportunity Index was designed to rank neighborhoodswithin metropolitan areas based on the opportunities they offer children and to then consider how equitably (or inequitably) children of different racial/ethnic groups are distributed across different levels of opportunity.

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