This is a public collection of knowledge funded and/or published by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF). Views, opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in these publications are those of the authors and their respective organizations. They do not necessarily reflect the views, policies or positions of WKKF.

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Covering More of Michigan's Children

November 1, 2021

For over a decade, Michigan has had the ability to be more inclusive and enroll thousands more of the state's children in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) but has not yet opted to do so. Specifically, these children are "lawfully residing," or lawfully present immigrants who meet Medicaid or CHIP state residency and income requirements, yet have lived in the United States for fewer than five years. Federal law requires lawfully residing immigrants to live in the country for five years before they can enroll in some public programs. The 2009 Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act (CHIPRA), however, gave states the Immigrant Children's Health Improvement Act (ICHIA) option to waive the five-year waiting period for Medicaid and CHIP for lawfully residing children (up to 21 years old) and/or pregnant people.

Food Finance Detroit: A Landscape Map for Financing Detroit’s Local Food System

July 20, 2021

With funding from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, CDFA is researching how development finance agencies can become more engaged in local and regional food systems. CDFA aims to advance opportunities and leverage existing financing streams to scale local and regional food systems by increasing access to healthy foods and creating new living wage and accessible jobs in communities across the country. 

Community Engagement; Food Systems

Hope Starts Here Detroit

January 1, 2021

Hope Starts Here is a connector of early childhood efforts in Detroit to mobilize a citywide commitment to support our youngest children and families, through a common vision, coordinated implementation, collective advocacy, and a shared infrastructure.

Doula Services for Improving Birth Outcomes

December 20, 2020

There are many factors that contribute to maternal mortality including cardiovascular events, infection and hemorrhage. Each of these outcomes is driven by social determinants of health, and the individuals affected are embedded in communities and served by systems with a history of unequal access and treatment that make these outcomes staggering.

Maternal and Child Health

Grand Rapids Entrepreneurial Ecosystem Assessment

October 20, 2020

In Winter 2020, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation engaged Regionerate LLC to assess the Grand Rapids Entrepreneurial Ecosystem. The goal of the project was to better understand current assets in the startup and small business ownership community related to innovation, talent, place-building, access to capital, entrepreneurship education and training, and small business assistance.This report presents initial findings and recommendations designed to build capacity for entrepreneurs of all types and sizes with a special focus on increasing underrepresented minority business participation in the historically high-growth economy of Grand Rapids. In order to foster a strong entrepreneurial network and attract additional outside resources, Regionerate offers high-level findings and recommendations to guide WKKF and other investors in: (1) delivering programs that broadly serve the entire network; (2) piloting programs that fill demonstrated gaps in the ecosystem and ultimately spin into the network; and (3) funding or scaling established powerful programs to reach more entrepreneurs.Evaluation ObjectiveThe purpose of the evaluation is to provide an objective, third-party perspective on the Entrepreneurial Ecosystem, including the current resource providers, resource connectivity, and gaps for stages of business development and growth. 

Putting Economic Inclusion Data to Work in Grand Rapids

October 8, 2020

This past spring, the Johnson Center released a new report, underwritten by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, examining data on economic inclusion in particular neighborhoods of Grand Rapids, Michigan. The Economic Inclusion in Grand Rapids Data Update looks at changes in economic inclusion between 2014 and 2018 in the city's Neighborhoods of Focus — an area stretching across the west and southeast portions of the city, roughly John Ball Park on the city's west side to Eastown and neighborhoods to the south of Wealthy Street.Disaggregated data — data that can be broken down and examined based on different characteristics like racial and ethnic identity, gender identity, age, employment status, and so on — can be an incredibly powerful tool for community understanding and decision-making. Individual organizations and entire networks can use the same data to target their work, track progress, and ultimately create better outcomes for all.We are always grateful to hear how people and organizations use data to further their missions — and we hope their ideas and efforts can inspire others, as well. Research manager Melyssa Tsai O'Brien recently spoke to Stacy Stout, director of equity and engagement with the City of Grand Rapids, to learn more about how the City is using the Economic Inclusion in Grand Rapids Data Update.

Racial Equity and Healing

Essential Jobs, Essential Care Michigan

September 28, 2020

Throughout Michigan—in private homes, nursing homes, and a variety of residential care settings—older adults and people with disabilities rely on more than 120,000 direct care workers to meet their daily needs and participate in their communities. Further, when properly trained, supported, and integrated into care teams, direct care workers can promote better care for consumers and prevent costly outcomes. Unfortunately, despite their enormous value, direct care workers struggle with low compensation, insufficient training, and limited career paths, which drive many workers out of this sector. The COVID-19 crisis has amplified these challenges, leaving many workers without safe, high-quality jobs—and consumers without the care they deserve.

Economic Inclusion in Grand Rapids

April 1, 2020

This report presents an updated review of progress toward economic inclusion in the Grand Rapids, Mich.area. It summarizes the changes between data reported by Dr. Mark White of the Center for Regional Analysisat George Mason University and the Center for Regional Economic Competitiveness in Addressing Economic Inclusion in Grand Rapids (2016) and the most recently available data obtained from public sources — primarily comparing data from 2014 to 2018. Data are displayed in various geographic groupings and disaggregated by demographic characteristics for comparison. This report, sponsored by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF), is intended to aid ongoing strategy development for promoting inclusive growth in the Grand Rapids area.

Racial Equity and Healing

Economic Inclusion in Grand Rapids Data Update - Executive Summary

April 1, 2020

This report presents an updated review of progress toward economic inclusion in the Grand Rapids, Michigan area. It summarizes the changes between data reported by Dr. Mark White of the Center for Regional Analysisat George Mason University and the Center for Regional Economic Competitiveness in Addressing EconomicInclusion in Grand Rapids (2016) and the most recently available data obtained from public sources — primarily comparing data from 2014 to 2018. Data are displayed in various geographic groupings and disaggregated by demographic characteristics for comparison. This report, sponsored by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF), is intended to aid ongoing strategy development for promoting inclusive growth in the Grand Rapids area.

Racial Equity and Healing

2019 Workforce Assessment of Michigan’s Local and Regional Food System

December 1, 2019

This report is the first in a series summarizing a 2019 workforce assessment of Michigan's local and regional food system. The local and regional food system can be defined in a number of ways. For the purposes of this study, the local and regional food systems encompass organizations that produce, process, or distribute food from Michigan that is available to Michigan consumers, and/or organizations that support this system.The research included: a scan of Michigan's food system jobs: where we collected and analyzed secondary labormarket data to identify local and regional food systems employment; demand; projected growth; median wages; and worker demographics, an employer's perspective of Michigan's local and regional food system workforce, and a scan of education and training opportunities in Michigan's local and regional food system: an inventory of education and training programs for local and regional food system jobs.

Food Systems

Promoting Thriving Families and Equitable Communities through Small Business Lending in Detroit

June 10, 2019

Like many U.S. cities, the majority of Detroit's residents – 86% – are people of color. Unlike many cities, more than 50,000 own small businesses, making Detroit the fourth largest city in America for entrepreneurship by individuals of color. Though they are major drivers of economic growth in the area, Detroit's entrepreneurs of color struggle to secure the financing necessary to start or grow their businesses. 

Impact Investing; Racial Equity and Healing

Promoting Thriving Families and Equitable Communities through Small Business Lending in Battle Creek

May 31, 2019

Battle Creek is the home of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF), where cereal entrepreneur Will Keith Kellogg invented cornflakes, launching the modern cereal industry. More than 100 years later, this spirit of entrepreneurship remains central to the Battle Creek economy, with small businesses employing 35 percent of the area's 50,000 residents and creating two out of every three net new jobs in the United States.To ensure that all residents of Battle Creek can prosper, families must be able to support themselves and communities must be equitable places of opportunity. In support of that vision, in 2018 WKKF launched the Battle Creek Small Business Loan Fund (the "Fund"), committing $10 million to provide start-ups and growing businesses with a wide range of financing and technical assistance. The Fund is a response to BCVision, a community-wide effort launched by WKKF in 2014 to better understand the needs of the people of Battle Creek. Canvassers knocked on 30,000 doors, spoke with 8,200 residents, and engaged thousands more through online surveys and social media. Across all demographic groups, residents identified the need for more employment and entrepreneurial opportunities.

Impact Investing; Racial Equity and Healing

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