This is a public collection of knowledge funded and/or published by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF). Views, opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in these publications are those of the authors and their respective organizations. They do not necessarily reflect the views, policies or positions of WKKF.

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Expanding Equity Inclusion & Belonging Guidebook

May 1, 2022

As many corporate leaders know, inclusion and belonging are vital to company health and success. Creating workplaces where every employee can bring their whole selves to work leads to deeper levels of commitment and higher levels of innovation. A key question is: how can leaders and companies create a culture that embodies a feeling of inclusion and a sense of belonging for all employees? This guidebook, created as part of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation's Expanding Equity program, will support you on that journey through the following sections: 1. What is racial equity? 2. Putting the "I" in DE&I 3. Talking About Race (and Racism) in the Workplace 4. Moving Beyond Allyship to Sponsorship 5. Developing Champions for Racial Equity

Employment Equity; Racial Equity and Healing

Doing Evaluation in Service of Racial Equity: Diagnose Biases and Systems

November 3, 2021

Why focus on biases and systems? Everyone has racial biases, whether they like to admit it or not. They can have a stereotype positive or negative about a racial or ethnic group and when they meet someone from that group, they often treat that person differently without even realizing it. It is important to recognize that implicit biases are deeply rooted and that even individuals with the best intentions can have them. Good intention or not, racial biases can cause harm. And it is up to the individual feeling the bias to decide if it is harmful saying "that wasn't my intention" does not change the outcome for the person or community on the receiving end. This is why it is so important for us, as evaluators, to put in the time and work to uncover and address our implicit biases so we can better understand ourselves so can make better decisions and bring attention to others in our circles. 

Racial Equity and Healing

Doing Evaluation in Service of Racial Equity: Deepen Community Engagement

November 3, 2021

Why focus on engagement? The term community engagement is so easy to say. The term connects people with each other, and it seems so simple, so natural and so human. We place the term community engagement before a convening, meeting or act as a symbol of our good intentions (Chavis & Lee, 2015). It conjures images of neighbors making and delivering food to vulnerable residents during the COVID-19 pandemic, people of color advocating for equitable treatment of young Black men and residents at a county council meeting expressing their concerns about the lack of healthy and fresh food in the community. It is so common a term that we almost never define it or explain what we mean by it. 

Racial Equity and Healing

Doing Evaluation in Service of Racial Equity: Debunk Myths

November 3, 2021

Why focus on myths? Myths are popular beliefs or traditions that are not true, but because these beliefs or traditions are passed along unchallenged, people start to believe they are true. Myths about key concepts in evaluation such as rigor and objectivity are shaped by our mental models' frames of how something works that guide our perceptions, behaviors and how we approach and relate to both other people and our surroundings. These mental models tint and narrow our view of the world we encounter. 

Racial Equity and Healing

A Racial Equity Framework for Workforce Development Funders

January 31, 2021

The framework was born out of a dire need to do better. Many laudable workforce programs and practitioners are making strides in their communities to improve job opportunities for People of Color. Yet it is not enough. The framework outlined in this report identifies concrete ways to interrupt the systemic racism embedded within the field's practices, policies, and programs; the institution of philanthropy; our own organizations; and the labor market in communities we serve. It asks funders in the workforce development ecosystem to consider how we are using our power, influence, grantmaking, and roles within our institutions to contribute to, or dismantle, this racism.

Employment Equity; Racial Equity and Healing

A Racial Equity Framework for Workforce Development Funders (Executive Summary)

January 31, 2021

The framework was born out of a dire need to do better. Many laudable workforce programs and practitioners are making strides in their communities to improve job opportunities for People of Color. Yet it is not enough. The framework outlined in this report identifies concrete ways to interrupt the systemic racism embedded within the field's practices, policies, and programs; the institution of philanthropy; our own organizations; and the labor market in communities we serve. It asks funders in the workforce development ecosystem to consider how we are using our power, influence, grantmaking, and roles within our institutions to contribute to, or dismantle, this racism.

Employment Equity; Racial Equity and Healing

Power Beyond Measure: Reshaping the Research and Evaluation Landscape for Boys and Men of Color

January 1, 2021

Power Beyond Measure: Reshaping the Research and Evaluation Landscape for Boys and Men of Color is a new research agenda that outlines six strategies for advancing equity and opportunity for Boys and Men of Color (BMOC) in the U.S. These strategies and recommendations lift up ways to ensure their voices and perspectives are reflected in research and funding; to promote power and capacity-building in their communities; and to build more equitable, anti-racist research and evaluation systems.

Racial Equity and Healing

An Annotated Bibliography on Structural Racism Present in the U.S. Food System, Seventh Edition

January 1, 2021

The purpose of this annotated bibliography is to provide current research and outreach on structural racism in the U.S. food system for the food system practitioner, researcher, educator, and advocate. Our intention is to update this resource on a recurring basis. We suggest it be used as a companion resource for training or education sessions on structural racism in the food system.This annotated bibliography on selected resources and publications is focused on structural racism in the U.S. food system. Structural racism in the United States has been defined as the "normalization and legitimization of an array of dynamics—historical, cultural, institutional, and interpersonal—that routinely advantage Whites while producing cumulative and chronic outcomes for people of color." 

Food Systems; Racial Equity and Healing

A Call to Build Trust and Center Values in Food Systems Work

November 1, 2020

In September of 2019, 70 people from across the U.S. came together to learn from each other about the work of coordinating state level food system plans. The initial intention for this gathering was to surface promising practices of developing and implementing food systems plans—meaning guiding documents, such as the Michigan Good Food Charter or the Vermont Farm to Plate Strategic Plan, that are developed with public input, set out a vision for the food system of a particular place, and identify high priority policies and strategies. Over the course of planning and hosting the three day convening, it became clear that a focus exclusively on technical practices was neither practical nor what participants were most interested in. Instead, it was the complex and adaptive process of bringing people together and the way in which we shared our time that most resonated with many participants. To share more about the design and experience of the gathering, we—the facilitation team—first decided to write a reflection shortly after the event. Much has happened in the months that have followed. The urgency of our present moment in time can no longer be downplayed. The tumultuous events of 2020 have brought the long-standing inequities of our society into stark relief. Six months ago, we were prepared to inspire you to bring values and a focus on equity into your food systems work. Now, we are sending out a call to deep care and accountability to our fellow food system practitioners. If you are not actively working to counter white supremacy culture and structural racism, then your food systems work is in vain and you are reinforcing the status quo.

Food Systems; Health Equity; Racial Equity and Healing

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