This is a public collection of knowledge funded and/or published by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF). Views, opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in these publications are those of the authors and their respective organizations. They do not necessarily reflect the views, policies or positions of WKKF.

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Expanding Equity Inclusion & Belonging Guidebook

May 1, 2022

As many corporate leaders know, inclusion and belonging are vital to company health and success. Creating workplaces where every employee can bring their whole selves to work leads to deeper levels of commitment and higher levels of innovation. A key question is: how can leaders and companies create a culture that embodies a feeling of inclusion and a sense of belonging for all employees? This guidebook, created as part of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation's Expanding Equity program, will support you on that journey through the following sections: 1. What is racial equity? 2. Putting the "I" in DE&I 3. Talking About Race (and Racism) in the Workplace 4. Moving Beyond Allyship to Sponsorship 5. Developing Champions for Racial Equity

Employment Equity; Racial Equity and Healing

Diversifying the Healthcare Workforce: Implications for Birth Outcomes

August 1, 2021

A diverse maternal and child health workplace is one that has employees of different ages, genders, racial and ethnic backgrounds, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and personality bringing a multitude of lived experiences to institutions and organizations. The benefits of having a diverse workforce are far-reaching and include improvements to innovation, increased productivity, increased team communication and engagement (1-3). Overall, the U.S. population continues to become more diverse, and, in some states, there is a majority-minority population. This occurs when 50% or more of the population is composed of racial and ethnic minorities (3). While the population has continued to diversify, the healthcare workforce has not kept pace. These continued changes in the racial and ethnic make-up of the general population makes it likely that health professionals will engage with patients that have different cultural backgrounds from their own. The lack of diversity in the workforce across all health professions has revealed a national public health issue that needs attention. Initiatives and sustainable strategies for all local, state and federal levels and within public and private sectors will help better ensure that the healthcare workforce meets the needs of the diverse patient population and reflects the racial and ethnic diversity across the nation and in Michigan. 

Employment Equity; Health Equity; Maternal and Child Health

A Racial Equity Framework for Workforce Development Funders

January 31, 2021

The framework was born out of a dire need to do better. Many laudable workforce programs and practitioners are making strides in their communities to improve job opportunities for People of Color. Yet it is not enough. The framework outlined in this report identifies concrete ways to interrupt the systemic racism embedded within the field's practices, policies, and programs; the institution of philanthropy; our own organizations; and the labor market in communities we serve. It asks funders in the workforce development ecosystem to consider how we are using our power, influence, grantmaking, and roles within our institutions to contribute to, or dismantle, this racism.

Employment Equity; Racial Equity and Healing

A Racial Equity Framework for Workforce Development Funders (Executive Summary)

January 31, 2021

The framework was born out of a dire need to do better. Many laudable workforce programs and practitioners are making strides in their communities to improve job opportunities for People of Color. Yet it is not enough. The framework outlined in this report identifies concrete ways to interrupt the systemic racism embedded within the field's practices, policies, and programs; the institution of philanthropy; our own organizations; and the labor market in communities we serve. It asks funders in the workforce development ecosystem to consider how we are using our power, influence, grantmaking, and roles within our institutions to contribute to, or dismantle, this racism.

Employment Equity; Racial Equity and Healing

US Based Workforce and Board Composition Report by Race/Ethinicity, Gender and Job Category 2020

August 31, 2020

W.K. Kellogg Foundation's workforce composition and how it has changed over time.

Employment Equity; Racial Equity and Healing

Caregiving On and Off the Clock: Equity Issues Faced by Care Workers with Dependents

April 13, 2020

Care work is essential to meet the basic needs and wellbeing of any society. However, the U.S. faces a burgeoning care crisis. In the coming years, aging Baby Boomers will require an unprecedented amount of paid elder care services. Meanwhile, the current unmet paid child care needs remain high On the supply side, our research shows that gender and racial/ethnic inequities are built into the looming care crisis: 9 in 10 low-wage care workers are women and almost half are racial/ethnic minority groups.While there is clearly a high demand for care workers, little research examines how paid care workers afford and manage their own caregiving needs. Given that paid care workers with children and elderly dependents care around the clock—at work and at home—it is important to understand if they have enough of their own care supports to meet these needs. These questions are especially pressing during the current public health crisis, as care workers are called upon to care for the most vulnerable members of society and the importance of care work is more visible than ever. Paid care workers' ability to care for their own families even while they continue to care for ours is critical to our ability to weather the COVID-19 storm and be ready to care for our aging population.In this analysis, our sample of care workers includes a range of well-paid to poorly paid jobs including physicians, physical therapists, Certified Nursing Assistants and personal and home care aides.3 We consider care needs for children under 13 (e.g., child care centers, family child care), adult parents (e.g., at home, in a day program) or both, by race/ethnicity and work and family composition.

Employment Equity

Lessons Learned and Best Practices for Advancing Employment and Economic Mobility for Families: Integrated Service Delivery

April 1, 2020

The Working Families Success Network report highlights best practices and lessons learned from 15 years of programming related to bundled, integrated services toward advancing employment, financial health and economic mobility for jobseekers.

Employment Equity; Impact Investing; Racial Equity and Healing

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